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The James Bond 007 Dossier

Bond, James Bond.

11. March 2014 08:15
by m
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Enterprise Incidents James Bond Dossier Part 1

11. March 2014 08:15 by m | 0 Comments

I don't know much about this magazine, it is just something I spotted on ebay for $5. I suspect that a series of articles about the James Bond series were published in various issues of Enterprise Incidents over the course of 1983-1984, and that this is a special collectors compilation issue featuring them all together for the first time (why else would part 1 end with the words "To be continued..." if part two was always on the facing page?) While there is no publishing date to be found anywhere, we can deduce from the ad on the inside cover - showing a recent issue of Enterprise Incidents Magazine featuring stories on The Last Starfighter and Conan the Destroyer (both released in 1984), and Gremlins and Ghostbusters (both released in 1985) - along with the fact that there is no mention in here about A View To A KillA View To A Kill (1985), that this magazine was published sometime in 1984. If anyone else has any more information about this publication, we'd love to hear about it. The magazine is 56 pages long in total, and part 2 "Mr Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang" which explores GoldfingerGoldfinger and ThunderballThunderball will be posted here soon.

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001 James Bond Dossier Cover   002 Enterprise Incidents ad   003 My Name Is Bond   004 Casino Royale 1954   005 Dr No   006 Dr No  
007 Dr No   008 From Russia With Love   009 From Russia With Love   010 From Russia With Love  

The James Bond Movies Part One: "My Name Is Bond... James Bond"

By John Peel

It’s not easy to create a legend, but Ian Lancaster Fleming did just that when he wrote Casino RoyaleCasino Royale in 1953. In this book he first introduced his secret agent to the world and named him after an American ornithologist— James Bond. Bond was a sleek, almost conscienceless agent, with the coveted “Licence To KillLicence To Kill”, allowing him a double-oh prefix in Fleming’s version of the British Secret Service. He was a womanizer, a bon vivant, a heavy smoker and a gambler—and, above all, he was a success.

Fleming was born in 1908 and educated at Eton and Sandhurst, two staples of the old English tradition, before taking courses at the University of Geneva and later at Munich. He mastered French and German and joined Reuters News Service. For them he travelled about Europe writing, and made a mark in Russia by covering a secret trial for the Western world. In the Second World War, he joined the British Intelligence and after the war returned to newspapers. He worked on the London Times and newspapers in America and Africa.

Retiring to his home in Jamaica, GoldeneyeGoldeneye, Fleming decided that the time had come for him to write novels and penned Casino RoyaleCasino Royale, the first of the James Bond stories. The book sold very well and this prompted Fleming to continue the adventures of his agent in a series of titles that would include twelve other books. Apart from the Bond series, Fleming really did little other writing. He wrote a factual book, The Diamond Smugglers with the cooperation and encouragement of the diamond mine authorities in South Africa. The novel Diamonds Are ForeverDiamonds Are Forever had featured a section on the mechanics of diamond smuggling and this had impressed the men in the know enough to offer him help with a strictly accurate account of the “trade”. Another factual book (or two, In paperback) was Thrilling Cities, a collection of articles Fleming had written for a newspaper about his favorite seven cities and their attractions. Finally, he wrote a rather odd, but also very entertaining children’s book, Chit-ty Chitty Bang Bang, about the adventures of the Potts family and their very magical car. This was also to be filmed by the same team responsible for the James Bond movies.

Fleming never particularly liked Bond because he considered him more of an anti-hero than a hero, but he realized that the agent was very profitable. He attempted to kill him off in You Only Live TwiceYou Only Live Twice, but the publishers refused to lose a good thing and persuaded him to modify the ending, though Bond was never the same in the later books as he had been in the earlier ones. In The Spy Who Loved MeThe Spy Who Loved Me, Fleming experimented, very unsuccessfully, with having his heroine tell the story and having her response to Bond the central theme of the story. It was a dreadful failure because Fleming had no identification with Vivian at all; little as he liked Bond he certainly could adopt the manner and mannerisms of the spy very easily.

Photos: The first James Bond broadcast Upper left Ian Fleming, lower left Linda Christian the first Bond girl, center Barry Nelson as the original 007 and above Peter Lorre as Bond’s adversary.

Not surprisingly, the books attracted film-makers and TV alike. CBS in fact was first with offers, having purchased the rights to Casino RoyaleCasino Royale shortly after the book was printed. The story was filmed as part of the Climax anthology series, with American actor Barry Nelson in the role of the English James Bond. The production was filmed live, with an hour allocated to it. The only real set was that of the casino itself and the story was basically the card duel between Bond and LeChiffre, with few of the trappings of splendour that marked the Bond novels. Gone, also, was Vesper Lynde and the replacement was mundanely called Valerie. One of the hallmarks of the Bond books and movies was the exotic names of the leading ladies, but this first production had none of them.
Casino RoyaleCasino Royale (CBS TV, 1954) Broadcast: Thursday, October 21st, 1954, 8:30 PM

CAST

James Bond.......................Barry Nelson
Valerie.............................Linda Christian
LeChiffre.........................Peter Lorre

CREW
Screenplay.......................Anthony Ellis

Fleming wasn’t too impressed with the story and promptly sold the film rights to Gregory Ratoff for $6,000. Later, he regretted the deal and made no further film commitments of existing Bond novels until Eon Productions came along. Casino RoyaleCasino Royale did eventually make it to the big screen, the only Bond movie (until Never Say Never AgainNever Say Never Again) to be made by anyone but Saltzman and Broccoli. It finally saw light in 1965 from Charles K. Feldman and Columbia Pictures—but more of that in its proper place.

The real James Bond movie story started with Harry Saltzman. Saltzman was a Canadian film director who had bought the option for the series from Fleming’s agent, but who needed help and further backing to make anything of his option. Born in 1915, he had had experience in TV and then in the cinema. His version of Allan Silletoe’s Saturday Night And Sunday Morning (1960) which marked Albert Finney’s acting debut, was a critical and financial success and he was looking for further movies when he decided that Bond could well be the big hit that he wanted.

For a partner, he had ex-funeral director Albert R. Broccoli (yes, related to the man who named the green vegetable). Broccoli was born In 1909 and was of American descent, though he worked mostly in England. He formed Warwick Productions with Irwin Allen (the disaster master) and signed up Alan Ladd for three movies, including The Red Berets, whose scriptwriter was Richard Maibaum. Also involved in Warwick Productions and later in the Bond series were production designer Ken Adam and director Terence Young. Maibaum, also born in 1909, was an American script-writer, and became the writer who contributed the most to the screen image of Bond. He had written previously for such movies as O.S.S. (1946), The Great Gat-sby (1949) with Alan Ladd, and The Day They Robbed The Bank Of England (1960). Ken Adam, born in 1921, is an extremely innovative production designer. He won awards for Barry Lyndon and his work on Doctor Strangelove (1963) and has also worked on Around The World In 80 Days (1956) and The Ipcress File (1965).

United Artists agreed to distribute the films and things were finally under way for the James Bond saga. For the first title, since the original novel was unavailable, the team decided to work on Dr. NoDr. No. It was thought that the novel, filled with sinister Chinese tongs, missle-toppling and a Carribean hideaway for the bad Doctor, would be perfect for the cinema screen. Sticking very closely to the book for the most part, the script was written by Richard Maibaum from a treatment by Johanna Harwood and Berkley Mather. A few points were changed—for example, in the novel when Bond first sees Honey Rider, she is naked...in the movie she has a fairly tasteful bikini on, to avoid an X-rating for the film; in the book Bond fights an octopus but this was eliminated for the film due to the complications of shooting such a sequence; in the book, Dr. NoDr. No finally dies under a pile of bird dung—not quite cinematic! So he dies in a pool of boiling water In one of Ken Adam’s delightful sets.

Of course, there was the small question of who was to play the part of James Bond... Several people were
considered, and rejected, Including a youthful Roger Moore, before the team settled on Scottish-born Sean Connery for the role. (See the filmography of Connery in issue #1). He was a veteran of a few movies by this time, including Hell Drivers (1957) with William Hartnell, David McCallum, Jill Ireland and Patrick McGoohan, Darby O’GIII And The Little People (1958) for Walt Disney and Tarzan's Greatest Adventure (1959) with Gordon Scott. Connery had just the right air of dangerous excitement that the producers required and he gave the role a sophistication that it needed to be convincing. The pose of Connery In a suit and tie, with his hat and gun, is probably the most familiar image of James Bond to almost all of the viewers of the series. To many, Sean Connery is James Bond. Which is precisely what the producers (then) wanted.

Having signed up a star, the rest of the actors seemed almost easy. The part of the villainous Dr. NoDr. No was taken by Joseph Wiseman, with a little makeup to make him seem to be the half-oriental required by the story, and two metal claws that would eventually prove to be his undoing. Bond’s CIA sidekick, Felix Leiter, was played by Jack Lord, better known for his role In the TV series Hawaii 5-0. And the all-important role of the first of the Bond girls went to Ursula Andress, then an unknown actress married to cameraman John Derek. Ursula had not acted in English movies before and her accent was considered a little too marked, but Broccoli liked her. In a bikini, what did her accent matter?

Dr. NoDr. No (1962)

CAST

James Bond....................Sean Connery
Honey Rider.................Ursula Andress
Dr. NoDr. No..........................Joseph Wiseman
Felix Leiter............................Jack Lord
M........................................Bernard Lee
Professor Dent............Anthony Dawson
Quarrel...........................John Kitzmiller
Miss Taro........................Zena Marshall
Sylvia.............................Eunice Gayson
Miss Moneypenny.........Lois Maxwell
Puss-Feller...............Lester Prendergast
Strangways.........................Tim Moxon
Photographer............Margaret LeWars
Jones.................................Reggie Carter
Major Boothroyd.................Peter Burton
Duff.....................William Foster-Davis
Playdell-Smith...............Louise Blaazer
Mary................................Delores Keator
Sister Rose.........................Michele Mok
Sister Lily.........................Yvonne Shima

CREW
Producers.......................Harry Saltzman, Albert R. Broccoli (EON Productions)
Director...........................Terence Young
Screenplay..................Richard Maibaum
Johanna Harwood Berley Mather
Music composed by....Monty Norman
Orchestrated by................Burt Rhodes
Conducted by.....................Eric Rodgers

The James Bond Theme arranged and played by the John Barry Seven and Orchestra

Director of Photography......Ted Moore B.S.C.
Production Designer...........Ken Adam
Editor...................................Peter Hunt
Main Title Design.........Maurice Binder
Art Director.............................Syd Cain
Asst. Director.......................Clive Reed
Special Effects.................Frank George

105 minutes. Distributed by United Artists

In a burst of electronic noise, a small white dot on the screen moves over to the right and expands to become the barrel of a rifle, seen from the inside. It is tracking a behatted man, who whips out a gun, crouches and fires. A wash of red, the blood of the would-be assassin, floods over the screen and we hear the start of the James Bond theme for the first time. The dot becomes part of a dancing pattern of lights that herald the credits to Dr. NoDr. No and we are part of the way through them before they turn into the more usual dancing silhouettes that mark the distinctive title sequences created by Maurice Binder. The Bond theme turns into a calypso version of “Three Blind Mice” to show us that we are now in Jamaica.

The first of the Bond movies sets the pattern that will be roughly followed by the rest of the series, though in future openings the James Bond theme will start when the dot appears and then there will be a pre-credit “teaser'’ sequence. Only Dr. NoDr. No, From Russia With LoveFrom Russia With Love and On Her Majesty’s Secret Service would have an instrumental theme for the credits—all of the other entries would have songs with more-or-less unlikely lyrics that attempted to fit the title of the movie.

When the movie opens, we are treated to a strange assassination of-Strangways, the British resident agent in Jamaica, killed by the blind mice for poking his nose into Dr. NoDr. No’s affairs on the offshore island of Crab Key. Here the title villain has a perfectly legitimate bauxite mine and a secret missle-toppllng apparatus fueled by an atomic reactor. Strangways had discovered radioactive material on Crab Key, which made
him suspicious of the motives of the hidden mastermind. Killing the agent does little good, for it leads the British Secret Service to send in one of their top agents, 007, to investigate his mysterious disappearance.

Bond is first seen in a most typical pose—at a card table, with a cigarette, a drink and a beautiful woman eyeing his charms. “My name is Bond,” he quietly tells her. “James Bond." This would be almost a catch-phrase for the rest of the movies and Connery could deliver the line with almost magnetic appeal. He is called to a meeting with M, his chief, who is played by Bernard Lee, an old British actor. He had previously appeared in such films as The Third Man (1949), The Blue Lamp (1950), The Battle Of The River Plate (1956) and Whistle Down The Wind (1961'). Lee was perfect for the role, with a craggy, yet not unsympathetic face, a man who knew that he might be sending anyone he spoke with into impossible battle and sudden death. Assigning Bond, he has Major Boothroyd outfit him with a new gun. Boothroyd would never appear again, hls place being taken by Q, the head of Q Division, whose function was to invent helpful aids for the agent in the field. (Incidentally, Q was actually called “Major Boothroyd” in one movie, quite incorrectly. The movie was The Spy Who Loved MeThe Spy Who Loved Me.)

Once outfitted, Bond arrived In Jamaica and stirs everyone up, including the CIA in the form of Felix Leiter. With his aid and that of the Jamaican boatman, Quarrel, Bond arrives on Crab Key, having traced Strangway’s movements. Here he learns that the island is reputedly prowled by a dragon and that It harbors less than friendly guards. He also here meets Honey (Ursula Andress In the white bikini), collecting shells and singing "Underneath The Mango Tree” to herself. A run in with the dragon (actually ä converted armored car with a flame-thrower) leaves Quarrel charred and Bond and Honey in Dr. NoDr. No’s clutches.

Dr. NoDr. No explains that he is a refugee from the Chinese tongs, whom he had robbed. They had cut off both of his hands, so he now has a pair of metal appendages that have tremendous strength. He works for SpectreSpectre— the Special Executive for Counter-ln-telligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion—and is toppling the American missiles for money. Bond escapes from the cell with difficulty, manages to arrive In Dr. NoDr. No’s splendid reactor room in time to put the dampers on his scheme and turns the reactor critical. No, in a fit of temper, attacks Bond, but the two of them end up on an elevator heading down into a cauldron of boiling water. Bond escapes, but Dr. NoDr. No cannot get a grip on the wet metal with his metal hands and so perishes In the water pit. Bond rescues Honey and they escape just before the reactor explodes.

The movie is very low-key compared to later entries in the series, but has a special charm of its own. Bond seems to be more calculatedly lethal in this one, as opposed to his rather more offhanded way with the killing in later movies. He quips his way through most perils, a suggestion made by Connery himself to liven up the character, and played almost to death as time went by. The action is suspenseful, the plot fairly intelligent and the movie well-edited to create the suspense and drama required. The only really terrible part of the film is the apalling score. John Barry’s arrangement of the James Bond theme was superb and quickly proved to be a hit. He was asked back to handle future chores for the films, much to my relief. The soundtrack for the movie was written by Monty Norman and consisted in equal parts of the James Bond theme and a handful of insipid calypso songs that were meant to be topical. Thankfully, Norman never did another score for the series because the one he did grates badly on the nerves and interferes with the movie in just about every place.

Dr. NoDr. No was a success. It had cost a mere 300,000 pounds to make and more than doubled this figure just in its British release. Critical reaction was mixed (the Vatican didn’t care for it), but what did that matter? Bond was quite clearly a success, and there was of course only one thing to do—make a sequel.

At the end of the movie, we were promised: JAMES BOND WILL RETURN IN From Russia With LoveFrom Russia With Love. True enough, he did...

From Russia With LoveFrom Russia With Love (1963)

CAST    
James Bond.....................Sean Connery
Tatiana Romanova.......Daniella Bianchi
Kerim Bey..................Pedro Armendariz
Rosa Klebb...........................Lotte Lenya
Red Grant.............................Robert Shaw
M........................................Bernard Lee
Sylvia..............................Eunice Gayson
Morzeny...........................Walter Gotell
Vavra..........................Francis de Wolff
Conductor.......................George Pastell
Kerim’s Girl...........................Nadja Regin
Miss Moneypenny............Lois Maxwell
Vida..........................................Aliza Gur
Zora...............................Martine Beswick
Kronsteen....................Vladek Sheybal
Dancer...............................................Leila
Foreign Agent..................Hasan Ceylan
Krilencu............................Fred Haggerty
Chauffeur........................Neville Jason
BenZ.....................................Peter Bayliss
Mehmet.............................Mushet Auaer
Rhoda.............................Peter Brayham
Q...............................Desmond Llewelyn
Masseuse.........................Jan Williams
McAdams.........................Peter Madden

CREW
Producers......................Harry Saltzman, Albert R. Broccoli (EON Productions)
Director.........................Terence Young
Screenplay.................Richard Maibaum, Johanna Harwood
Director of Photography.......Ted Moore B.S.C.
Editor.......................................Peter Hunt
Art Director.............................Syd Cain
Asst. Director.............David Anderson
Title Song Written By..........Lionel Bart
Sung By..................................Matt Munro
The James Bond Theme.......Monty Norman
Score Composed & Conducted By...John Barry
Special Effects....................John Stears, Frank George
Stunt Arranger.................Peter Perkins
Costume Design......Jocelyn Rickards
Titles...........................Robert Brownjohn, Trevor Bond

116 minutes. Distributed by United Artists.

This time it was the mixture as before, only more so. Only two major changes and one omission were made. The omission was that of Ken Adam, as his specialty of huge, fantastic sets would not be required in this movie, which was even more filmed on location and with familiar interiors than Dr. NoDr. No had been. The changes were in the title design (Maurice Binder was missing and the titles were completely shot on the stomach of a belly dancer....) and in music. Gone was the intrusive score of Monty Norman, though he had left a heritage in the form of the James Bond theme that would appear In all successive films, and in was John Barry.

John Barry had arranged and played the James Bond theme, taking the tune into the charts and making it one of the very few film themes recognized by almost everyone who hears it. The decision to let him score the movie was very sensible and he produced a stunning soundtrack to match the film; Bond had found his musical style, which would remain with him. Though Barry wasn’t to do all of the movies, virtually all of the scores were based around his concepts of the musical style of Bond. John Barry had started as the founder of an instrumental group, the John Barry Seven, which had a string of instrumental hits. He had discovered and promoted singer Adam Faith, and when the popular vocalist made the movie Beat Girl (1959), naturally Barry wrote the soundtrack. His first was followed by a string of successes, notably the Bond films, and he gave up his group to concentrate on films. His score for Born Free (1966) won him two Academy Awards and that of The Lion In Winter (1967) another. Other scores include King Kong (1976), Midnight Cowboy (1969), Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland (1972) and The Black Hole (1979).

The movie, after the opening shot at the camera, has a pre-credit sequence wherein a phony James Bond is stalked and killed in a SpectreSpectre garden by Red Grant, a superb assassin, played by Robert Shaw. The late actor had first come to attention through his popular TV series, The Buccaneers, and then went into movies, including The Dam Busters (1955), A Man For All Seasons (1966) and of course Jaws. He was a perfect choice for the hardened, emotionless killer, Grant, who stalks Bond throughout the movie.

The plan is to discredit the British Secret Service, in the person of James Bond, by showing him for a womanizing failure and then to kill him in incriminating circumstances. It is thought up by mastermind Kronsteen played by the superbly sinister Vladek Sheybal. Sheybal, generally given bit parts as villains, and who had a small role in the Gerry Anderson TV series UFO, has a piercing face, an engaging accent and a suitably nasty manner for the role. Also helping out was Rosa Klebb, played by actress and singer Lotte Lenya. First made famous in her husband’s opera The Threepenny Opera, she even played herself in the Broadway version of Cabaret. It seemed a strange choice, then, to cast her as the lesbian (though this was hardly mentioned in the movie) heavy, but she was magnificently malevolent in the part. The last of the trio was Blofeld, who is seen only as a back in a chair. He is playing with a white cat— his trademark. The uncredited role was played by Anthony Dawson, who had been Professor Dent in Dr. NoDr. No.

Bond is lured to Istambul—where the action and treachery will take place— by a supposedly love-struck, filing clerk for the Russian embassy, Tatiana, who offers to give Bond a top-secret decoding machine, the Lektor.-A trap is naturally suspected and Q appears to give Bond a handful of lethal gadgets. This is in the form of a suitcase, with a fold-away gun, tear-gas traps and a pair
of throwing knives. He also gets to use a wristwatch with a garotte in it, courtesy of SpectreSpectre. This is the first time that gadgets make their mark in the Bond movies, and as time goes by, they make a larger and larger contribution to the films, at times to quite a ridiculous degree. In From Russia With LoveFrom Russia With Love, however, they are fairly subdued and reasonable. Playing Q was actor Desmond Llewelyn, who is one of only two actors to survive the Bond series through, the other being Lois Maxwell, the omnipresent Moneypenny. Lois had made her debut in 1946 in That Hagan Girl, with Ronald Reagan and Shirley Temple, and she still continues to play Moneypenny, though she has otherwise given up acting to write in her native Canada.

In Istambul, Bond meets Kerim Bey, their man in command there. Actor Pedro Armendariz played the genial, roguish agent, and he died as the film was being completed. Kerim helps him to meet Tatiana, and then to escape from Istambul when she really does fall for the British agent. Tatiana was played by a newcomer, Daniela Bian-chi, who was not a great choice for the role. She had no previous acting experience and virtually none after, disappearing from the film scene with hardly a ripple.

On board the Orient Express, Red Grant strikes, but Bond wins through, killing the assassin with his own watch-garotte. Escaping the train, Bond and Tatiana are attacked by a SpectreSpectre helicopter—which he manages to
shoot down with the concealed gun in his briefcase—then by a pack of pursuit boats—which he burns behind him. Their final hazard is that of the maid in Venice, who is Rosa Klebb in disguise. Attempting to puncture Bond with a poisoned knife in her toe-cap, she is overpowered and arrested. Kronsteen having died earlier through the same knife, only Blofeld is left at large—but Blofeld, of course, is the worst of them all.

The movie was an even greater success than Dr. NoDr. No had been. It was the greatest moneyspinner of the year, and a wave of Bond mania swept the world. The books were selling at an unprecedented rate (not at all harmed by the fact that President Kennedy had admitted that the novel From Russia With LoveFrom Russia With Love was one of his favorite books), and the public seemed quite happy to take Bond movies as fast as they could be made. From Russia With LoveFrom Russia With Love had a complex plot, fascinating villains, fast action and some of the most spectacular sequences ever seen in such a film. One of the highlights was a gypsy fight between two women who wanted the same man, and this proved to be very popular indeed. One of the girls, Martine Beswick, was to be given a better role in ThunderballThunderball. Also In the movie was Walter Gotell, another long-time Bond actor, who would return several times as General Gogal.

The stage was set for the rest of the Bond movies now, with all of the main ingredients: the opening sequence with the shooting of the man with the rifle barrel; the pre-credit teaser; the title sequence with dancers and gymnasts; the gadgetry and strange weaponry; M, Q and Moneypenny in London and SpectreSpectre as the villains, personified by the fanatical, cat-loving hidden shape of Blofeld; the beautiful girls, the chases, the high life; and the exotic locations, getting further and further out with each movie.

Bond had firmly set his mark on cinema history at this point, though the best was yet to come. We were told that It was: THE END OF From Russia With LoveFrom Russia With Love... BUT JAMES BOND WILL RETURN IN GoldfingerGoldfinger

(To be continued)

Bibliography

James Bond In The Cinema by John Brosnan (Tantivy/Barnes)
The James Bond Movies by Steven Jay Rubin (Arlington House)

[Source: Enterprise Incidents Presents The James Bond Dossier, P. 1-10. © 1984 New Media Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.]

 
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